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Pegasus Tow plane

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  • Pegasus Tow plane

    This is my first build thread here, although I have followed many of the excellent builds here for some time.

    I picked up these plans from Steve Passierb a few years ago.

    As this is my first Tug build, I am hoping for feedback and suggestions from the community of pilots and builders on this great forum. Please don't be shy.

    I realize the Pegasus is an older design, but I just liked the look of it.

    I have one of Peter's Chmelak kits under the bench, but wanted to finish this one first.....

    I transferred the outline to the luan ply and have cut both fuse sides at the same time with a router.

  • #2
    The formers were cut on the table saw from aircraft ply with the inside of the bulkheads removed to save some weight.

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    • #3
      Finished formers on the spindle sander.

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      • #4
        A lot of memories from your post. My build thread here on Scale Soaring was lost in the hacking a few years back. I have many years of flying my Pegasus which I built with a lot of help from several of my
        local flying buddies who helped me when I ended up severely tail heavy. I think making things a light as possible instead of really strong like I did will help in your build. a 120 cc engine will allow you to tow anything that will show up. I made mine 108% because I had 150cc engines lying around. We call it the beast and it is still flying and has been a work horse the past 7 years of our Sled Works Aero Tow here in Minnesota each summer.
        Good luck with your build and keep us posted on your progress.
        kevin

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        • #5
          Cool! Love to see more tow planes being built!
          Kevin K

          Kremer Aerotowing Team

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          • #6
            Been towing since 2003...it got a great work out at the Apache Pass aerotow last year and at Sledworks ,
            Attached Files

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            • #7
              Gordon, make sure you add hardpoints and flying wires on the stab as shown in Jim’s photo above. Early plans didn’t have this feature and losing stabs and elevators in flight was not an uncommon occurance. AMHIK
              BTW, thanks for sharing this. Lots of memories there. Flew my first Pegasus in the late 90’s.
              Last edited by Asher Carmichael; 03-21-2020, 02:14 PM.

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              • Tom
                Tom commented
                Editing a comment
                I remember when that happened at Triple Tree.....you rolled it over and used the flaps as elevators and “landed” it without destroying it! I was impressed......

            • #8
              Asher..I will definitely do that when I get to the tail group

              Kevin, I remember reading your 108% build thread. At the time it was my first exposure to the airplane.

              This one will have a 3W 106 that was recently checked by Gerhard at Aircraft International.

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              • #9
                The Mighty Peg! This green monster did a ton of service for us on the East Coast circuit. 3W-120 on a 3-blade. It lived first in Len's feet and then in mine.

                So cool that you're digging into the plans! Thanks for sharing your build.

                Click image for larger version  Name:	image_16093.jpg Views:	3 Size:	71.1 KB ID:	40435
                Team PowerBox Systems Americas... If flying were the language of men, soaring would be its poetry.

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                • jfrickie
                  jfrickie commented
                  Editing a comment
                  That Peg now lives in Wichita Ks,,,,,,It will be flying soon....If my part time job had not turned into a full time job it would already be flying

                • Steve P
                  Steve P commented
                  Editing a comment
                  It's the most well-traveled Pegasus in the business... CA-->CT-->KS. Enjoy!

                • jfrickie
                  jfrickie commented
                  Editing a comment
                  It was picked up from a bug in the Great White North so you need to add Minnesota to the list

              • #10
                Here's our 'Peg. As you can see it is modified to V-Tail which turned out great as it keeps the towline between the stabilizers. Also a custom mod around the tail wheel to stop it picking up the line if you happen to run over it.

                This plane was modified and built by Nigel Tarvin, and came into our hands a couple of years ago. Suffered a rough merge with high density material, but has been repaired to fly again!

                Old Brison 105 twin as power, just right for most of what we do. Originally was a manual ignition, now modified to electronic and runs like a charm.

                Dave Smith
                Attached Files
                Last edited by Dave Smith; 03-22-2020, 09:18 PM.

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                • Gordon McLean
                  Gordon McLean commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Hi Dave...sorry to see that yours took such a hard shot, but glad to see that you are flying again....what size are your wheels?

                • Dave Smith
                  Dave Smith commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Gord, they are 8" Cub wheels

              • #11
                I really appreciate everyone posting photos of these great Pegs ! Love the different color schemes.

                I got a bit done this weekend. I was able to get the incidence for the wing set, drilled for the wing tube, and ripped the wing spars.

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                • #12
                  Just an option, but I decided to do the 108% with removable horizontal stabs so I would have more room in my van for gliders on the way to the flying field.
                  I found some salvaged ARF 1/3rd scale horizontal stabs on rcgroups , used auto hook up to the servos, and used carbon tubes and a removable 4-40 allen machine screw to allow removal.
                  I have had those stabs on and off hundreds of time without fail. Being that they are semi symmetrical, they are actually stronger than the balsa stick design of the original Peg Stabs.
                  My Peg is in storage at the moment, but if you want pictures of this, can send some.
                  kevin

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                  • Gordon McLean
                    Gordon McLean commented
                    Editing a comment
                    Hey Kevin...I would be interested in seeing how it is done...don't go out of your way, just whenever you get it out of storage. thank you !

                  • Dave Smith
                    Dave Smith commented
                    Editing a comment
                    Our V-Tail peg stabs are removable as well, but the tubes they mount on are permanently attached to the airframe. Nevertheless it certainly saves some transport and storage space. I'll post some pix in the next few days. Same technique could be used for horizontal stabs, with the added advantage that the tubes could be dismounted too.

                • #13
                  Click image for larger version

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ID:	41283Here are some photos of the detachable horizontal stabs I talked about earlier on my 108% Peg. These stabs were salvaged Aero Tech Extras but I am sure most any symmetrical airfoil that is strong enough that hold the servos would work...they are held on by a 4-40 allen bolt threaded into a piece of oak dowel glued inside the carbon tube. It has worked flawlessly for hundreds of assemblies..
                  On one side the bolt is left fully inserted, while on the other side it is screwed in and out with allen wrench. female tubes were made by wrapping wax paper over the carbon tubes. connectors are by Digi Key which are a bit hard to come by but I bet MXP or others would work too.
                  Keep up the good work... Click image for larger version

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