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1923 B3 'Charlotte II' in 1:3 Scale

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  • #16
    Mike,

    once again a great sailplane you are modeling.

    I love these sailplanes book, you can dream and flight high even in winter, this on is a good one!

    Keep on posting!

    Stéphane

    Stéphane
    Horizon Hobby Team Member

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    • #17
      Petr, better get in the shop!
      Thanks, Stephane! The ribs are constructed from 'A' up to 'J'. Just gotta build 'K' through 'O' then the 'extended' ribs outboard of these which will be 14 more ribs! Since it isn't anything different looking to post... I haven't! Each of the ribs from 'A' to 'O' has 46 parts. That's 630 parts and doesn't include trial fitting and sanding, etc. It's best to not think about it.

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      • #18

        I know, I've been bad My daughter's hockey season is almost over so I hope I'll get to spent more time in the shop soon.


        That's a lot of parts ..... just for ribs! You are a real builder my friend! It's always fun following your build. Thanks for the posts.

        Petr

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        • #19
          FYI,
          Michael, I just check the calendar and there's 98 days until the maiden.

          just sayin
          Len Buffinton
          Team Horizon Hobby

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          • #20
            Mike,

            don't listen to Len,

            there is only 75 days until Wilburt Wright Aerotow, no pressure I know it will be ready in 60 days

            Stéphane
            Stéphane
            Horizon Hobby Team Member

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            • #21
              Originally posted by lenb View Post
              FYI,
              Michael, I just check the calendar and there's 98 days until the maiden.

              just sayin

              Tick-tock, tick-tock, tick-tock........

              Petr

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              • #22
                As usual Michael, nice work. Those built up ribs have me thinking about Hol's wing again.

                Not much work on the Cherokee this weekend....more bike riding though. A little over 55 miles these weekend!

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                • #23
                  Petr- glad you are having quality time with daughter. Sailplanes can wait!
                  The Charlotte will get done when it's done. Sorry Stephane but this one gets maidened at the Horizon Hobby Aerotow along with the Franklin Eaglet. It's an informal 'tradition' Len and I have worked out. I can bring a small 1/6 scale Nimbus 4D to Wilbur Wright Birthplace Aerotow for you to maiden for me if I get it done. I only bought it back in 1996 or so! I have the retract and doors working properly, the canopy frame is painted with canopy installed and the spoilers work freely. They were a pain to get operating without hanging up. Just gotta finish radio install.
                  Dion, after you get your Cherokee done maybe you can put the Hols back on the board. If you build washout in the wing it won't fly as bad as some have experienced. I finished all the ribs for the straight portion of the Charlotte's wing. I started on the 'extended' ribs for the swept back portion of wing. They are a little more laborious. Has to do with swept spar and wing thickness transitions. I'll get pics soon. I have been cutting wood like a beaver!

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                  • #24
                    Here is a picture of the micarta patterns used to make the balsa LE and TE rib parts. It takes an hour or so to build a rib not including adding gussets. The second picture shows a stack of ribs for the constant chord portion of the wing and a rib on the 'LE trimming jig'. This is used to get the false LE nice and square when it gets added later. A root rib is 'belly to belly' to an outermost constant chord rib demonstrating the differences in the spar slot angles. Two of the extended ribs are shown plus a third one without gussets. The rest of the pictures are just close ups of the particulars. I have six more ribs to build. Whew!

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                    • #25
                      Whoa thar yung fella, At's a mite big plug of "backy" you dun bit ofen fer yer sef. Shore tastin' gud tho, tain't it?
                      Incredible as usual, Mike.

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                      • #26
                        Beautiful work Mike.........incredible attention to detail and amazing patience !

                        Looking forward to seeing it in person at some point this summer.

                        Bob

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                        • #27
                          Way to go Michael. Thanks for keeping the thread updated. Excellent build!!
                          Len Buffinton
                          Team Horizon Hobby

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                          • #28
                            Hey Asher! Yessir... BIG plug! Funny thing but I've set, topped, cut and hung 'backy' but never smoked, snuffed, dipped or chewed it except for an occasional cigar celebrating the birth of others' children. I love how tobacco smells in the barn!
                            Bob, thanks for checking in here! You hit the nail on the head... patience is what it takes! Everything else is a by-product, lol.
                            Len... thanks very much! Glad to contribute. Even if some folks aren't interested in these types maybe they will find them amusing or come away with a useful tidbit.

                            Off with their noses! The ribs got put on the jig in order to mark their noses for trimming. This will allow the false spar stay 'square' as referenced to the building board. Remember... the ribs gradually 'wash out' toward the tip so if they were all trimmed equally with respect to each other then the LE would have to be installed 'twisted' to compensate. I don't like 'forcing' materials into place. You can see how the penciled line aligned with the slot edge on saw. Easy-peasy!

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                            • #29
                              The 'Charlotte II' has a wire or cable TE. To anchor them at the rib TEs I came up with this solution. Aluminum tube segments were cut, slotted, then the 'slot flaps' were peened over a mandrel to make an 'eye' for the cable to pass. A slot depth of ~3.5mm found to be ideal. The 'mandrel' was a drill bit. Four of the tubes had to have 'angled' eyes to fit the ribs that transition from the Hershey bar portion of the wing to the extended ribs. These were fun to make! I made a few extras. I love whacking objects with a hammer! Where's Jeremy? A brass tube sized the same as the aluminum tubes was used to cut the rib TEs. The brass tube has 'teeth' cut into the end. Works great! The nose trimming jig was modified to become an 'aluminum tube spacing jig'. I'm of Irish heritage and love jigs! After all the aluminum tubes were epoxied in place 1/64" ply was glued to strengthen the rib ends. The ribs are done!!! Next... elevators and ailerons.

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                              • #30
                                Good nose job on the ribs and very cool idea with the tubie thingies.

                                The ribs are piece of art. Most people's airplanes don't have as many parts as each of your ribs

                                Petr

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