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40% Ka-3 part scratch part kit

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  • 40% Ka-3 part scratch part kit

    Started this project last fall. Just the start a lot more to do.

  • #2
    Cool! Very scale like construction...

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    • #3
      Gene, nice to see you on Scale Soaring. I hope all is well with you and Ida. Keep up the good work. Are you still building the second one as well?

      Larry

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      • #4
        Gunny11 the Ka-3 airframe is being built from full size drawings found on the Vintage Sailplane Association.com site. They have a wealth of documentation available in there archives. Also check out there 2018 calendar.

        Larry, AURP suggested I post here. Ida and I are doing fine. Off to Reno at the end of the month with Dean Gradwell and the Cherokee for the VSA convention, should be fun. The second one is for Dean as he is providing the wing and stab parts.

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        • #5
          Very nice work! Thanks for posting! I received my VGC News magazine just the other day and the VSA is a great resource. Are you going to put in functioning cockpit controls!

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          • #6
            AURP,
            I have all the drawings so only time and incentive will tell, but most likely.

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            • #7
              Gene, exceptional as usual. A little info about the materials used and the joining techniques?

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              • #8
                Just remember Asher you asked for it.
                The airframe is jig assembled with attention to preparation so as to making it easy. First a coping block was drilled, milled for 3/16, 1/4, and 5/16 dia doweling. Using 3/16 dia endmill, 1/4dia and 5/16dia forester bits in a drill press to provide perfect coped ends. You still had to measure twice and drill once however. A reference line was drawn on the side once one side was seated to make the second cut more accurate. Any adjusting due to angle was accomplished with a rat tail file of the appropriate dia. Once the doweling was glued together edges were then biscuit cut to except 1/16 or 1/32 plywood biscuits. These were glued in place while the form was still in the jig to insure alignment. A set of drill jigs were made for a #60 drill bit to pin the cross bracing with glue and a 18ga brad set just below the surface with a wire punch. Where the upper longeron changes diameter a 1/16 wire was used after drilling both sides with the 1/4 dia drill jig and using a lath to drill the center of the 5/16 dia cockpit area dowels.
                Poplar doweling was hand selected for the project. This required setting in the hardware isle checking each dowel for straightness, grain structure and to be sure it was free of knots or weak areas. This is on going so just except the fact that your an old man setting in the isle playing with sticks. Forming jigs were cut and routed to except the steamed doweling to contour the nose and tail sections.
                The following photos should be self explanatory.

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                • #9
                  Excellent Gene! You are totally doing it right. I'm a big fan of jigs too.
                  its a lot of work, but it will be rewarding knowing it won't fall apart on ya....

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                  • #10
                    Gene, thanks for sharing. That technique is the sort of mesmerizing work that I could totally get absorbed in and lose all track of time....and not in a bad way.

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                    • #11
                      So begins the process of assembling the front of fuselage two. The setup is checked as least twice before the epoxy is even mixed. During reassembly excess epoxy is removed to make clean up easier later. After rechecking the setup and measure from the level squared to the fuselage to the tail to insure all is right it's time to leave it alone to cure and have a cup of tea.

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                      • #12
                        You might just as well buy a 'Joint Jigger', some 1/4" steel tubing and start welding! The construction is very nice! Thanks for showing your technique. I can sure identify with going to the local hardware store and eyeballing dowels and other pieces of wood. At 13' this won't be a small glider! I'm a push over for 'V' tails, too!

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                        • #13
                          Finished installing all the bracing between the tail boom and wing saddle to fully join the two together aft of the cockpit. Between time epoxy was curing, time was spent working on making the bungee hook out of 14 ga stainless steel. Not the softest material to work with for sure.

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                          • Asher Carmichael
                            Asher Carmichael commented
                            Editing a comment
                            Details, details.... I love ‘um. Looking good, Gene

                        • #14
                          Awesome! Truly beautiful construction!
                          Member In Good Standing - "Builds Slower Than A Dead Turtle Nailed To A Fencepost" Club

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                          • #15
                            Built a low tech steam chamber for working on the skids. A full length support was required after a while due to the 2in dia tube bending from the heat. Again a print was scaled, printed and glued to a 2x6 to form the wooden skid. After a week or two it should be dry enough to remove from the form.
                            Started fitting the shoulder harness retainer brackets to the frames.
                            Still working on the front end of fuselage #2.

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                            • ARUP
                              ARUP commented
                              Editing a comment
                              Is the skid Ash?

                            • Gene C
                              Gene C commented
                              Editing a comment
                              ARUP, the skid is selected straight grain Poplar. I had thought of Ash but It is not the easiest of wood to come by in such small quantity. The bottom will have a metal shoe to take the wear.
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